Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Online Quilt Class

I was gifted with the iquilt class Abstract Quilts in Solids by Gwen Marston. I've read several of her books but never took a class from her. There are so many projects in my queue but I finally found some time to work on her first lesson: triangles. 

The brown and navy are actually prints rather than true solids. Gwen recommends NOT overthinking the layout but I had trouble not scattering those light pinks a bit more. How did they end up in such a small section? And then edged with a few bright greens. I discovered those two brighter green leftovers wrapped inside the olive green fabric. Their added spark saved this quilt.

Green, red, navy, brown, grey, and pink triangles form random patterns across this quilt.
Triangle quilt top

About 25" by 28" this top is good for a quick study. Not sure what it will become. I may add some Sujata borders to boost it to baby quilt size.

EDIT: About six months ago, Janie at Crazy Victoriana posted a top she made from the same class. Linking with Linda for Sew, Stitch, Snap, Share.



We managed to see Their Finest, a comedy/drama centered around Catrin (Gemma Arterton), a scriptwriter working on a propaganda/morale building movie about Dunkirk during WWII. Bill Nighy stars as a hilariously vain actor. As the show develops an American is added to aid film distribution in the US. Jake Lacy plays a seriously bad actor. So funny. It reminded me of Jean Hagen's performance in Singin' in the Rain. Is it harder to be a good actor or for a good actor to play a bad one?


The movie prompted me to read Crooked Heart, also by Lissa Evans and also set in WWII. This one concerns a young London evacuee and his woman drowning in debt who takes him in. I really enjoyed the beginning and end. 






"Oh, give me a home where the buffalo roam. Where the deer and the antelope play." Not many buffalo but loads of the latter two grazing everywhere. Although I never saw people feeding them, they roamed freely in town, on the plains and on the hillsides. This one was in the park of the small town of Saguache. 


Deer in Saguache, CO
Enjoy the day,  Ann

27 comments:

  1. I have that online class by Gwen. Marvelous to hear her voice and watch her hands as she works. Why is it that so many of us feel everything we make needs to have a purpose? I want to get to where the making itself can be enough ...

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    1. I think a surprising number of us have her class. I hope to work on the next unit in August; trying to fit it in around my other projects and also have contemplation time. One of the benefits of online classes is working at our own pace. I've decided I need to think about the meaning more.
      Making quilts is what I'm driven to do. I want them finished and in use somewhere. I guess that makes me an artisan rather than an artist. But if they don't "go out into the world" I would soon run out of space to store them. Ha.

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  2. I have seen that class and wondered about it, so I'll be interesting to hear what you think as you progress through it. I like the balance of colours; those sharp greens are definitely earning their keep.

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    1. I've questioned the validity of online classes but am finding the ability to review lessons offsets the in-person aspect. Then I hesitated because I wasn't sure about the solids. After all that fretting I'm enjoying the class.
      There were three other solids in my stash but I decided not to throw them all in. But the greens were a variation of the others in use. I'm finding I like the change it add, especially when they aren't in the exact same color wheel position.

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  3. I enjoyed Gwen's segment on TQS. Her desire to inspire others is also something that inspires me!

    Studying your quilt a little, I notice that I like the bottom six rows, with their random distribution of darks and lights, better than the top two rows, where the lights and darks are lined up. That is good to know! I will remember that for my waterlily project, that I really hope to start again soon...

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    1. I didn't see her on TQS. It would have been fun. Now that you mention it, I see quite a difference between those rows and like the bottom part better, too. I think I'd also like all the triangles lined up like the first two rows. Isn't it great to pick up a point from other people's work! More random would be better for your project.

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  4. I too have wondered about taking one of Gwen's classes, if only to hear her talking and describing why she does what she does. Your little abstract quilt is very sharp looking. It's interesting how your 'color palette' is shining through even with choosing solids!

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    1. What a treasure Gwen is to quilting. I've enjoyed all her books but hadn't taken a class with her.

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  5. What fun doing one of Gwen's online classes! I've yet to make an 'all-solids' anything!

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    1. Her class is very helpful, especially being able to review repeatedly. I made solids quilts back in the 80s but nothing since then.

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    2. ... and thanks Ann for linking up with 'sew stitch snap SHARE'

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  6. I also have the on-line class with Gwen, it's excellent. You're so right, that light green adds a real sparkle and I'm wondering now about your border, a Sujata style border sounds interesting.

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    1. It will be fun to compare our results and our opinions, Maureen. She is such a talented teacher. I guess she always was, but it's obvious to me that she has years of teaching experience. I didn't think these fabrics went together much but those odd greens and pinks helped pull it off. I've no idea what the border will look like: some of these fabrics are gone. I'd like to add some prints. Must mull it all over.

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  7. quilt looks so colourful lovely

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  8. There is a metro park right down the hill from my house and the deer roam the neighborhood snacking on everyone's flowers.

    Your triangles will make a cute center for a quilt.

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    1. I just watched a news article that lobstermen have helped them prosper by strictly enforcing size range and refusing to harvest any mating-age female. I think most deer hunters prefer males with lots of points. I certainly see lots more females. And they don't seem to be afraid of humans. Wonder how large their population is?
      Thanks. I hope this can translate into something. It's a bit too big for a pillow although I might cut it into two parts.

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  9. Gwen's 'iquilt' classes are wonderful. I like her sense of humor.
    Her 'don't over think it' idea has worked well for me too.
    Your triangles are super. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. I found your post about her class and am adding a link to mine. Love your results!

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  10. What a novel and exciting color palette! The pink triangles just add sparkle!!

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    1. How kind of you, Mel. I love the colors you choose. This may approach some of your work... I hope.

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  11. Wonderful quilt, Ann! It's got that Gwen Marston/Gee's Bend magic.

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    1. It was relaxing to work that quickly and realize the results are as good or better than some things I've sweated over.

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  12. I love the colours you have used. I always find 'random' hard to do too.

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    1. It was for me. I actually pieced two section: the top two rows are not so random. I wanted to try both the. Couldn't find a way to back out without unsewing. Ha.

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  13. thanks for pointing me in the direction of "Their finest" and "CRooked Heart" They both look like stories i would enjoy.

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    1. I liked the film adaptation of Rheir Finest even better than the book. Quite unusual for me. But the book had a better title : Their Finest Hour and a Half.

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